How to get a Too Good To Go Morrisons box

Picture of a box of red peppers, apples, spring onions and carrots

Fruit and veg for less with Morrisons via Too Good To Go

Recently, Morrisons started offering £10 food for £3.09 via Too Good To Go, the food waste app.

Read on for my top tips if you want to bag a tenner of food for only a few quid – and find out what I got in my Too Good To Go Morrisons Magic Bag, and what I made with it! 

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Pinterest size image of the contents of a Morrisons Too Good To Go box

What is Too Good To Go?

If you haven’t come across Too Good To Go, it’s a free app where you can buy fresh food at a discount, because it would otherwise be thrown away at the end of the day.

Previous post: My 5 favourite apps to cut food costs

You buy a ‘Magic Bag’ with a random selection of items for less than they would normally cost. You pay via the app, using a card, PayPal or Apple Pay, and must then collect your food during a specific time slot. Morrisons is the first UK supermarket to take part, alongside cafes, restaurants and bakeries including big names like Costa Coffee and Yo Sushi.

I love the idea of Too Good To Go in cutting food waste as well as cutting costs. I’ve used it several times in London, to snap up discounted sandwiches, pastries from a Turkish cafe, curry and rice from an Indian restaurant and a vegan rice box. Trouble is, here in Hadleigh, there’s very little nearby. 

But we do have a branch of Morrisons – so when I heard Morrisons had joined Too Good To Go, I headed straight for the app. I figured few people near me would use it, so I’d have more chance of buying a box than in heavily populated areas.

Screen grab of Morrisons on Too Good To Go app

My local Morrisons on Too Good To Go

What can you get from Morrisons via Too Good To Go?

A Magic Bag from Morrisons will contain mainly fruit and veg, with potentially some bakery and deli items. The food is discounted because it’s past the ‘best before’ date, although still fine to eat.

Remember, you don’t get to choose – it’s like a lucky dip. All you know is that it should be worth at least £10 when full price. The short dates also mean you’ll need to eat it, cook it or freeze it, fast.

You order and pay via the Too Good To Go app, then collect your food during the time specified. You can’t just rock up in store and demand a Magic Bag.

Previous post: 80+ ways to save money on your food shopping

Picture of a brown box with baguette bags from Morrisons via Too Good To Go

Less a Magic Bag, more a Magic Box

Tips for getting a Morrisons box on Too Good To Go

Currently, there are only a couple of boxes each day offered at each Morrisons branch, and Too Good To Go has more than 2 million users.  

That’s not great odds for actually getting one!

Here’s how to increase your chances of nabbing one of the elusive boxes:

  • Download the Too Good To Go app
  • Check if your nearest Morrisons is taking part, via the ‘Discover’ page or on the ‘Map’
  • Check when the collection window closes, as tomorrow’s Magic Bags normally go on sale 15 minutes afterwards
    • Morrisons normally has a long collection window from 12 noon to 18.00, meaning the new Magic Bags should pop up at 18.15. On Sunday, ours was posted at 18.00. Go figure.
  • Check when today’s Magic Bags sold out
    • At our Morrisons it’s normally 18.16, 18.17 or even 18.15 – so super quick!
  • Make the store a favourite, by pressing the ‘heart’ top right
    • This makes it easier to find and refresh
  • Set an alarm on your phone for 10 minutes after the collection window ends. 
  • When the alarm goes off, open up Too Good to Go, and find your local store. Keep refreshing, and pounce when the grey ‘Sold Out’ button changes to a green ‘Buy Now’ version. I find it easiest to refresh by swiping down on my favourites.
  • Click through to pay
    • If you’ve bought a Magic Bag before, the app will store you payment details, making it easier to complete the transaction
  • Show up at the store during the collection window, go to customer services and show the receipt on your phone
  • When the staff bring the box, let them swipe across to confirm you’ve received your Magic Bag

Sound like a hassle? Check out my previous post on bagging yellow-snickered bargains


What I got in my Morrisons Magic Bag

So here’s what I got from Morrisons via Too Good To Go (sung along the lines of ‘On the First Day of Christmas…’)

  • 2 broken baguettes (guessing normally 80p each)
  • 2.3kg box of clementines (normally £3)
  • 2 x 750g boxes salad tomatoes (normally £1.30 each) 
  • 2 x 3 packs of red peppers (normally £1.45 each)
  • 1kg bag wonky onions (normally 65p) 
  • 2 x 1kg bags wonky avocados (normally £2.40 each) 

Total: £14.75 bought for only £3.09

Collage of 12 photos of breakfasts, lunches and dinners from Too Good To Go box

Making meals from a Morrisons Magic Bag

What did I do with the contents of my Morrisons Magic Bag?

Would I normally buy 20 avocados? No. But once I got them from Too Good To Go, I wanted to make the most of them!

So here’s what I made based on the contents:

Breakfasts

  • avocado and sliced tomato on toasted baguette
  • poached egg with avocado and tomato on baguette
  • breakfast burritos with scrambled egg, avocado and tomato
  • fried egg with chorizo and avocado on toast

Lunches

  • prawn cocktail with avocado, lettuce and toast
  • bacon, lettuce, avocado and tomato sandwiches
  • red pepper and butternut squash soup
  • mozzarella, tomato and avocado salad with balsamic dressing
  • ham and avocado sandwiches
  • salami, avocado and tomato bagel

Main meals

  • a riff on poke bowls, with grilled trout, rice, peanuts, carrot, avocado and tomato
  • sausage and red pepper casserole with new potatoes and mange tout
  • chicken fajitas with red peppers, guacamole, tomato salsa, cheese and creme fraiche
  • turkey bolognese with pasta and broccoli (used some of the onions!)
  • chicken, avocado and tomato cous cous

 

Picture of the 6 jars of clementine marmalade I made

When life gives you clementines – make marmalade

We worked our way through a load of the clementines, but after one went mouldy, I hastily made the rest into clementine marmalade, which can be given away for Christmas.

After collecting the box on December 1, it took 10 days to eat the contents – and I’ve still got some onions left!

 

Picture of the contents of my second Too Good To Go box from Morrisons

Heading back for a second box…

Verdict on Morrisons Magic Bags from Too Good To Go

Morrisons is a whole different ball game on Too Good To Go.

Normally, if you buy a Magic Bag from say an Indian restaurant or a carvery, you’ve got a fair idea of what you might get.

But a Magic Bag from Morrisons is much more like Ready Steady Cook (youngsters: Google it).

You get a random collection of fruit, veg and bakery items and somehow need to make it into meals. Each individual box is completely different, depending on the store, stock left and the generosity of whoever is filling it.

I was delighted that my £3.09 box was worth way more than the promised tenner at full price. But it’s only a bargain if you actually eat the food – and if you don’t like it, or can’t use it fast, you won’t actually cut costs or food waste. 

My main tip if you manage to get a box is to think what on earth you can make, jot down meal ideas, and buy the extras ingredients needed. So for example, faced with a mountain of tomatoes, avocados and peppers, I bought yellow-stickered chicken breasts, wraps and fajita seasoning to make chicken fajitas. I then used the last wrap as a breakfast burrito, with eggs we already had, plus more of the avocado and tomato.

So if you like cooking, give it a whirl. If you’re all about convenience food, this isn’t going to help. 

You may not want the faff of frantically refreshing the app or collecting a mystery selection of items in a specific time frame, compared to picking and choosing your own food. I’m keen on saving cash and food waste, and enjoyed meal planning – so I’ve even been back for a second box (photo above)!

The staff member apologised that there wasn’t much in it, but I still reckon the contents would have cost £13.65 at full price. I wouldn’t have bought the mini donuts and iced Christmas biscuits, but the kids enjoyed them. Meanwhile I’ve got another useful heap of fruit and veg, including more red peppers and spring onions than you can shake a stick at.

 

Now – over to you. Have you ever nabbed a Morrisons box from Too Good Too Go? Would you ever buy one? Do share in the comments, I’d love to hear!

Plus any suggestions gratefully received on what to make with my second box!

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2 Comments

  1. Eloise
    19th December 2019 / 7:47 pm

    Time was when leftovers such as this were donated to almshouses. My aunt was the matron of an almshouse with around 20 residents. A couple of times a week that would be a knock on the door and Marks & Spencer’s would unload several boxes of fresh foods, not just fruit and veg but the meat and fish too. The residents would then come and take what they wanted. Sometimes there was even salmon and prawns and other things that many of the elderly people couldn’t afford to buy at full price. Nowadays the supermarkets are out to make as much money as possible so even sell off the things that they wouldn’t have done previously. Almost every town has a food bank and I would prefer to see the food donated to the foodbank or to local community initiatives and so cheaply to the general public.

    • Faith
      Author
      20th December 2019 / 8:08 am

      Hi Eloise – Do agree that it would be great to see food that would otherwise be wasted get used for good causes. Suspect it would be tricky to distribute the fresh food sold in Too Good To Go boxes via food banks, as food banks usually focus on non-perishable items which are easier to store and less likely to rot before they can be handed out. Perhaps linking up with the kind of initiatives that could promptly cook and consume varying ingredients (soup kitchens? community meals?) might work. Reckon a couple of Too Good To Go boxes sold at each Morrisons branch is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of supermarket food waste, and some stores would be able to both sell boxes and support community initiatives.

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